The Pharaoh Hound Club
Our Patron:   Miss Marjory Williams

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Home
Breed History
Guidelines for Potential Owners
Breed Standard
Living with a Pharaoh
Owned by a Pharaoh
Club Champ Show Results
Club Open Show Results
Crufts Show Results
Championship Shows 2016
Patella Luxation
Judges Criteria
Judges List
Information/re-homing
Code Of Ethics
Membership
Club Books - For Sale
Club Goods
Guest book & Links

I am sometimes asked if this is the dog that doesn't bark. Oh, how I wish it were. But no the Pharaoh Hound does indeed bark, a lot! Not that he barks because he enjoys the sound of his own voice but he does have tremendous hearing and naturally responds to distant sounds of other dogs barking, or the postman arriving (at the other end of the street) or because that darned blackbird is In his tree again and it's too high for him to catch.

Did I say that he has good hearing? Well, yes he does most of the time, but when you want him to come in from the garden or to get off the furniture or down from the kitchen worktops, then he suffers a sudden and profound case of deafness. He is not being disobedient for the sake of it. It’s just that there always seems to be something more interesting anywhere other than where you want him to be. Letting him off the lead when out for a walk can be risky, as once loose he will disappear into the undergrowth on a hunting foray and it may be hours before you see him again, although you will hear him, barking for joy as he discovers the scent of a rabbit or other small mammal. There is no point in calling him under these circumstances, as he will not hear you. If you want to be able to let your Pharaoh Hound off the lead when you take him for walks, you need to start recall training from a very early age. Even then you had better make sure that the area where you let him run free is enclosed although, if there is a hole in the fence you can be certain that he will find it.

LIVING WITH PHARAOHS

 

 

 

This breed should come with a Government Health Warning! He is without doubt the jester of the canine world and needs a lot of patience and understanding. The Pharaoh Hound is a slow maturing breed and he doesn't usually calm down until he's well into the Veteran classes. He is very energetic and requires a lot of exercise he also needs an understanding owner. This breed is highly intelligent and has a keen sense of humour. He is full of mischief and enjoys causing havoc for his human family.

 

In recent years there has been an increase in a new type of reality TV programme and one of the most popular is "It’s Me Or The Dog" featuring dog trainer Victoria Stilwell and, in the last series, Pharaoh Hound Rama. Rama's family contacted the programme because they felt he was out of control and they needed help. He pulled when he was taken for a walk. He stole food and items of clothing, dug up plants and made holes in the lawn. The programme set out to turn this unruly hound into a loveable companion that the whole family could be proud of, and it succeeded. Rama's behaviour however was not exceptional; it was fairly typical of a young Pharaoh Hound bursting with energy. He just needed a change of diet and some basic obedience training. He also needed to learn who was in charge in his household.

The Pharaoh Hound is a loveable rogue, full of life and ready to enjoy every minute of it, whether you are in the mood to join in or not. If you're not he will happily amuse himself - digging up the garden, ripping up his bedding or helping himself to any food that happens to be left unguarded for a second or two. The speed at which illicit food can disappear is quite remarkable. And when confronted with the crime, the big Pharaoh grin and wagging tail makes it impossible to stay mad at him for long.

 

This is not a dog for beginners. He is first and foremost a hunter and that hunting instinct is never far from the surface. Having said that, most Pharaoh Hounds can live quite happily with cats and small furry animals if they are brought up with them from an early age, although woe betide the neighbourhood moggies if they venture onto his property! They are habitual hunters and it seems that almost anything is considered suitable prey. Moths, butterflies, bees, wasps, in fact: anything that flies within easy reach of the Pharaoh Hound jaws. They do not discriminate between what is harmless and what could give them a nasty sting. They have also been known to take birds out of the air. The Pharaoh Hound is capable of jumping considerable heights and, with his ability to dig, a good sturdy fence is required to keep him from escaping. We recommend eight-foot chain link; six foot above ground and two foot below. Seriously though, a good sturdy fence is required if you don't want your Pharaoh roaming the neighbourhood.

Life with a Pharaoh Hound is never dull. They can be a joy to live with. Their sense of fun can brighten the dullest day. Their mischievous nature can drive one to despair at times but it is this same quality that makes them so endearing. They are not totally impossible to train. We wouldn't be able to show them if that were the case, as a certain amount of discipline is required in the show ring. In Sweden some Pharaoh Hounds are doing obedience at a very high level and at least one has already become an Obedience Champion, whilst another is doing Heelwork to Music and getting rave reviews. Agility is popular with a lot of breeds and Pharaoh Hounds have taken to it with enthusiasm. They are also pretty good at lure coursing and track racing, which is no surprise as these sports encompass most of the elements of the hunt. And the Pharaoh Hound is an excellent hunter, whether you want him to be or not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Those of you who have not had the pleasure (yes, I do mean pleasure) and the privilege of owning and living with this wonderful breed must think that we who do, are a little odd to put up with his outrageous behaviour. Well, life is never dull with a Pharaoh Hound around and you cannot be sure what he will get up to next, but he makes up for all the angst by being the funniest, the cleverest, the most loyal and loving companion you could ever wish to have.

I started this piece with a warning, and here's another. You cannot have just one; they are addictive and if you are not careful you could very easily find yourself with wall-to-wall Pharaoh Hounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by : Barbara Brooker©

May 2007

 

(Written for the  Pharaoh Hound Feature in  “Our Dogs”  June 2007)